Hope Cahill a Lucian?

There is a prominent theory going around amongst many clue hunters. Unlike other theories, I can definitely see why a strong, experienced clue hunter would believe this. It does in fact seem very likely, but for it to be true, there would a contradiction among information.

Dan and Amy’s Branch

People (especially me) are anxious to find out Dan and Amy’s branch. Why? Because if we know that, then the rest of the story basically falls right into place.

There are definitely a lot of things to take into consideration when forming your opinion, especially because almost anything could be considered a hint. As I’ve mentioned before, there are false leads, and there are real leads. It’s our job here to figure out which are true.

Hope Cahill’s Branch

One of the many leads which may tell us who the siblings owe their allegiance to is the question of their mother’s branch.

It Wouldn’t Help Us that Much

In my opinion, although it would help a lot, knowing her branch still wouldn’t tell us for sure what Dan and Amy’s is.

The reason for that is because take for example Gideon and Olivia Cahill (this is an example that I use a lot!). They had five kids, but for now we’ll just focus on the known four: Katherine (Ekaterina), Jane (Janus), Luke (Lucian), and Thomas (Tomas). They all founded the branches in parenthesis. Therefore they and their parents all belonged to different branches (something that I’ll look more into later) .

Another example that I like to use is that in Gordon Korman’s live webcast for book two, he says that he and his son are of different branches (Gordon is a Janus while his son is a Lucian). When asked the question if it’s possible that Dan and Amy are of different branches, he responded with the visibly cautious answer that anything is possible. This means to me that people who are related don’t have to be in the same branch. And, if you think about it, as Gordon also mentioned, we’re actually all related. Imagine how many million kids at the moment are part of your family at this moment, and how much that number will decrease when the hunt is officially over.

Okay, So What am I Talking About?

As you can tell, I have a tendency to ramble on and on and on. If you’ve made it through all the above content, you’re probably wondering what in the world am I talking about?

Is Hope Cahill a Lucian?

Okay, so what these people believe is that Hope Cahill belongs to the Lucian branch. I can remember reading book one and taking it for granted that she was part in that clan. Probably because there was so much focus on the Lucian’s and the puzzle that Dan solved. Of course, we’ve come a long way since then, and here’s what fuels the argument at this point:

On a card (Scholastic would probably sue me if I showed it here, so I’m not going to do that), it shows instant messaging between Alistair and Hope. On the desktop, there is a folder called “Lucian Codes.” This could mean that she’s a Madrigal, who managed to hack into the Lucian system, but what about the other branches?

In another card, there is a message from Grace to Hope where Grace says that Lucian’s solve the code especially quickly.

Why this is Not the Case

While that evidence is compelling, and she may have been a Lucian at one point, or at least pretended to be one, she certainly wasn’t at the end of her life.

The reason for this is that when the fire was set to her and her husband’s lives, Isabel Kabra was the one who instituted it. She would obviously not risk losing valuable agents. What is likely is that either Hope had hacked the system or started out as a Lucian but then took the clues for themselves. We all know that they were hiding things from them, certainly.

So, even if she was a Lucian by heritage, she wasn’t by the end of her life.

Published in: on December 22, 2009 at 9:58 pm  Leave a Comment  
Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Do Grace and a Madrigal have the Same Goal?

Grace Cahill and William McIntyre Seem to Have the Same Goal in Chapter One, Book One

By now, in the time of awaiting the seventh book and to find out what Amy and Dan’s branch is, most people have forgotten all about the events of the first book. However, I have lately started to go through all the books and take notes on anything that could possibly mean anything.

One of the things which I read extremely carefully was the very first thing we read, before we even knew what the names of the main characters were: Book one, chapter one. There we meet Grace, who I consider to be one of the top two most important people in the hunt, if not the most.

I believe that the interactions between Grace and her Madrigal lawyer are a huge clue to the secret.

Did you notice how they seemed to have the same goal:

“And if they don’t succeed…” (McIntyre)

“Then it all collapses. The family, the world, all of it. Five centuries of work will have been for nothing.” (Grace)

It certainly seems that Grace and William have the same goal, and we all know that the lawyer is indeed a Madrigal.

Does this mean that Grace is a Madrigal?

Not necessarily.

I say the above because although it seems extremely likely just from that, not to mention other evidence which I am not going to get into here, that Grace is a Madrigal, there are other explanations.

  1. 1. The Madrigal’s are Masters of Disguise

As pointed out in various places (such as the card pack two handbook and card 72 prestige), the Madrigals impersonate other Cahill’s. It is possible that the real William was replaced by a Madrigal.

However, that seems extremely unlikely because of the fact that there is no proof, which is again the bar that we measure ourselves on here when searching for the clues. Although it may be an attractive idea, the chance of it being likely is, at this point, zero.

  1. 2. It has been said that Grace Did Not Owe Her Allegiance to any One Branch

I cannot remember where, and I am sorry for that and will try to find it, but someone said that Grace choose to not side with any one branch. If that is true in the way that we are interpreting it, then she cannot be a Madrigal.

However, the Madrigals aren’t officially considered a branch, so I’m not sure if that means anything.

There have been rumors that there are good and bad Madrigals, or at least perhaps ones with different views. It is possible that Grace, The Man In Black (Fiske), and William all believe in the goal of the Madrigals, but believe that there is another way to get there.

In the Madrigal Maze game, and other places, it has been said that no one outside of the Madrigals knows their purpose. If that is true, then it would mean that Grace is technically a Madrigal, as said in other places, since she and William have the same goal and in the card pack two booklet, it says:

“I warned Grace she would be punished if she went after the clues. She should have listened.”

It is also possible, though, that Grace was a mix of all three branches, something that I’ll discuss later, which would mean that she technically is part of the Madrigals.

So, what’s your opinion on this?

Aunt Beatrice's Detective–The Man In Black?

If you read hear a lot, then you probably know that a lot of my blog posts are things that I’d filed away and was aware of but hadn’t really shared with anyone. With an introduction like that, of course this post is one of those. The subject of this 39 Clues post is who is Aunt Beatrice’s detective?

Remember when in the books, they casually slip away that Aunt Beatrice has hired a detective to find them? Well, I had always thought that it was the Man In Black, otherwise known as Fiske Cahill. I will not get into it here, but a page about why this is so is under construction at the moment. Fiske was the sister of Grace and Beatrice, and he mysteriously disappeared in the 1960′s. He is the Man In Black.

Since the Man In Black is a Madrigal, he would obviously make the perfect detective, especially since he is very closely related to Beatrice. However, I think that she hired a detective of a different purpose; to reach a goal. The goal is not to find Amy and Dan, but we all know from e-mails in our 39 Clues inbox and cards that the Madrigals need the Cahill siblings to follow a certain path. Beatrice might have actually wanted Amy and Dan to go for the hunt, and that is why she provoked them into doing it, although on the outside it looked like she was persuading them not to.

This may or may not be true, but I think that the evidence certainly increases in the following quote for book eight by Gordon Korman (believed to have the title of The Sacred Found, although there is no proof):

“As the race to find the 39 Clues builds to its explosive finish, Amy and Dan must steal a Clue guarded by thousands of the world’s best soldiers. With their enemies closing in, the siblings are separated. Together, they almost have a chance, but alone…Could the search for this Clue spell the end of Amy and Dan? And while they are separated, could their Aunt Beatrice’s detective find them?”

This sounds very flimsy, and there is no grounds that this excerpt is true, although there is a similar one from Amazon, just without the part about the detective. It’s just a guess, although it sounds like it could be likely, or at least something similar.

The Man In Black has had multiple chances to capture them, but it’s obvious that the Madrigals are waiting, from evidence that again, I’ll get into in other places.

There is not sufficient evidence, although it seems the most likely since there really are no other candidates. So, what do you think?

Aunt Beatrice’s Detective–The Man In Black?

If you read hear a lot, then you probably know that a lot of my blog posts are things that I’d filed away and was aware of but hadn’t really shared with anyone. With an introduction like that, of course this post is one of those. The subject of this 39 Clues post is who is Aunt Beatrice’s detective?

Remember when in the books, they casually slip away that Aunt Beatrice has hired a detective to find them? Well, I had always thought that it was the Man In Black, otherwise known as Fiske Cahill. I will not get into it here, but a page about why this is so is under construction at the moment. Fiske was the sister of Grace and Beatrice, and he mysteriously disappeared in the 1960′s. He is the Man In Black.

Since the Man In Black is a Madrigal, he would obviously make the perfect detective, especially since he is very closely related to Beatrice. However, I think that she hired a detective of a different purpose; to reach a goal. The goal is not to find Amy and Dan, but we all know from e-mails in our 39 Clues inbox and cards that the Madrigals need the Cahill siblings to follow a certain path. Beatrice might have actually wanted Amy and Dan to go for the hunt, and that is why she provoked them into doing it, although on the outside it looked like she was persuading them not to.

This may or may not be true, but I think that the evidence certainly increases in the following quote for book eight by Gordon Korman (believed to have the title of The Sacred Found, although there is no proof):

“As the race to find the 39 Clues builds to its explosive finish, Amy and Dan must steal a Clue guarded by thousands of the world’s best soldiers. With their enemies closing in, the siblings are separated. Together, they almost have a chance, but alone…Could the search for this Clue spell the end of Amy and Dan? And while they are separated, could their Aunt Beatrice’s detective find them?”

This sounds very flimsy, and there is no grounds that this excerpt is true, although there is a similar one from Amazon, just without the part about the detective. It’s just a guess, although it sounds like it could be likely, or at least something similar.

The Man In Black has had multiple chances to capture them, but it’s obvious that the Madrigals are waiting, from evidence that again, I’ll get into in other places.

There is not sufficient evidence, although it seems the most likely since there really are no other candidates. So, what do you think?

Ian and Natalie Kabra…Impersonated by Madrigals?

I touched on this here, but I think that this is easily important enough to have it’s own post, and probably infinitely more.

What I am proposing here is that there is a strong possibility that Ian and Natalie were impersonated by Madrigals. I have not found anyone who believes this except for me, so this may need more developing:

At the end of book two, Amy and Dan are about to snag a clue when Ian and Natalie roll in to steal the clue. Ian plays the notes on the piano, but he doesn’t know that one of the key’s is bobby-trapped, something that the Cahill siblings learned from their beloved Grandmother Grace.

The piano exploded, and the Kabras were badly injured. They were in very bad shape, certainly not well enough to participate in the deadly hunt. At the time, it was well known that they were out.

However, somehow, people forgot all about it. Sometimes I’ll mention their injury to some fellow clue hunters,  and they had completely forgotten. It’s probably because it was never really mentioned, and it was basically glazed over in book three. I have not forgotten, though, and I have always kept it in mind as I have searched for the clues.

The reason why I haven’t been really paying that much attention to it is because, in my opinion, it really is not that important. I do not care much about Ian and Natalie, as it was released in book six that they had no clues, and I had suspected as much. Therefore, they are not really central to the quest compared to other things.

It has become definite to me that they have been impersonated by Madrigals. We all know that Madrigals impersonate Cahill’s, as shown in various different places which I will not get into on this page, and it is impossible for them to continue after such a bad accident. Have you noticed that Ian and Natalie are not as ruthless and seem nicer in the previous four books than in the first two books? Isn’t also sort of suspicious that they have not really been a threat at all? The Madrigals obviously have a plan that doesn’t involve the Lucian’s getting the clues. It seems almost as if they have been helping Amy and Dan, which I’ll cover more in other posts and pages.

So, what do you think?

Published in: on December 20, 2009 at 1:23 am  Leave a Comment  
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Mission Six is Out!

On The 39 Clues website, the long awaited mission six is out. It is about the fight between Edison and Tesla, and how it had to do with the 39 Clues. It unlocks a clue, so go over and grab it!

39Clues.com

Published in: on December 19, 2009 at 9:07 pm  Leave a Comment  
Tags: , , , ,

Get to the Point

If you know me at all, this article may sound crazy. I do not like to be a hypocrite, and I would never teach you something that I myself don’t know. I admit that in non-fiction, I do not get to the point well. In this article, I will probably not get to the point well. However, on this blog, I speak about action/adventure, and in my fiction writing, I get to the point.

People read fiction books for fiction, not for rambling. They want to enjoy themselves, visualize the story, and in general just have a great time. They do not want to know details that will not enhance the story.

Details that make the picture clearer, better, are great. Details that say more about the characters are great. But, some people take this too far.

For example, I have read things that do not affect the storyline at all, like saying word by word that someone ate a bag of chips, watching TV, and enjoyed himself.

Yes, I’m all for giving details like that, because they give the reader a better view, but please leave it to something like what I wrote above. If your details either don’t affect the storyline or don’t give the reader a better picture, then they don’t enhance the story. Many people write for themselves; the thing to focus on is your reader. Always write for reader, and only put things in your stories that will enhance their experience.

I guess I didn’t ramble on too much in this post. Look at your stories—are there any unnecessary details?

Published in: on December 19, 2009 at 8:20 pm  Comments (1)  
Tags: , , ,

Arthur Trent not a Cahill?

This post is not infinitely important, but as with a lot of my content, it is just to dispel myths with common sense. And really, common sense is the key to figuring out The 39 Clues, because a lot of ideas get into people’s head which they then perceive to be fact, which has no common sense whatsoever.

This is another post to get those out of your mind, and today the myth is that many people believe that Arthur Trent is not a Cahill. When I first heard that rumor, I was skeptical. I looked into it on the web and found no evidence at all. Here are the two possible scenarios:

  1. It’s crazy

I think that this is what is most likely to be possible. Now, I’m not dogging the people who believe this, because once a rumor gets started, people usually blindly assume that’s its true and spread it around. The more people saying it, the more true it becomes.

It simply doesn’t make sense, unless point two is correct. Why would Hope let an outsider into her exclusive clan? It is also proven that they searched for the clues together. The prospect of a non-Cahill searching for the clues just doesn’t seem believable to me. Please tell me if I’m missing something.

2. There’s another branch of the Cahill family which we don’t know about

This is very possible, and I actual do believe it to some extent, although it is just a hunch, and there is no concrete evidence behind it. However, and this is just my belief, there are many out there, that Madeline, the founder of the Madrigal Branch, another daughter of Olivia Cahill, which I’ll talk in more detail about on the site part of this site had a daughter, who started another branch. I actually know the name of the believed branch, but I don’t want to throw you off track with incorrect information.

It’s possible that Olivia cheated on Gideon, so the Madrigal’s are only half related to the Cahills. That would make a lot of sense since Amy, Dan, Grace, Fiske, etc. are the only one’s who still bear the name Cahill, and that may mean that they are disconnected from the other part of the family in some way.

So, I really don’t know. There isn’t any proof that I can see, but that’s just one pair of eyes.

Published in: on December 17, 2009 at 8:16 pm  Leave a Comment  
Tags: , ,

Amy an Ekaterina? Dan a Tomas?

I know that I’ve already quickly dismissed this question in my main pages about the 39 Clues which has much more content and goes into more detail, because everything is linked together to form a big picture.

However, I would like to make a blog post (I don’t think it’s important enough for it’s own page) dispelling the myths about Amy being an Ekaterina and Dan being a Tomas.

If you look at the video below, then you will see the source of which all of this came from.

After watching this, I would like to say why I think that this is not true, and why you should definitely not believe it:

Okay, well, the reason is that, first, this is definitely unsubstantial evidence. That is because although it was produced by Scholastic, who runs the series, as it can be found on the Scholastic website, it could be a HUGE clue. However, I don’t think so, because it seems to me like they were trying to get in all of the branches and, of course, Amy and Dan’s names. Also, it looks like they are more pointing towards the thing in the middle, which is the Cahill’s. I think that is a clue that they belong to the Cahill’s, not any of the four branches. I still think that the video is insignificant anyways, because as you will be able to find on various pages on this site, it has been said that Grace did not owe her allegiance to any one branch. It is not set in stone, but seems likely that if she didn’t believe in giving herself to any one branch, neither did Hope, therefore Arthur Trent, and therefore Dan and Amy. I think that, instead, they belong to a different branch, which I don’t want to get into right now.

If there was more evidence for this, then I might pay it some merit. However, one piece of evidence, on it’s own, does not really hold a candle. It is certainly a possibility, but until further notice, it seems like a false lead.

Published in: on December 16, 2009 at 3:35 am  Leave a Comment  

Gordon Korman

Hey guys, today I would like to talk about someone whom I will most likely be talking about a lot on this blog, someone who is my writing idol, who talk to me to write well, who inspired me to write GOOD books.

What I mean by “good” books is that the writing of this man is simply tremendous. In fact, when asked how I would most want to have dinner with, although I’d already met him, I still choose him.

He’s written over 70 books for young adults, including the first when he was twelve.

In my opinion, Gordon Korman epitomizes the genre of action/adventure. The novels that he writes are simply classics, even after they’ve been out for just a few days.

Gordon has a style of writing that I would do almost anything to have, although I think that I am now coming nearer and nearer to it as I progress as an author. His style is to have the main idea of kids taking matters into their own hands. Really, that’s what kids want to read about, becausethey themselves want to control matters. The events in some of his books are fascinating, and yet real.

He would never write something that could not happen in real life, and he himself has said that his ideas stem from real life. “It’s probably about 50% real life, 50% imagination…by the end, you can’t really notice the real life, because my imagination has changed it, but I couldn’t have gotten there without it.”

Another staple of his writing is that he never really tries to teach lessons in his books. Now, I am not saying that there are not messages in them, but they are not forced in, yet come simply by nature, and it is obvious that he didn’t plan them. He once said that he is a kid pleaser, and doesn’t care about reviewers. It just goes to show that the authors who deliberately and unsubtly place lessons in their books care more about getting artificial sales from the committees. All that Gordon cares about is that people actually enjoy his writing, and couldn’t care less whether he got sales from people who don’t want to read it just because the school system loves awards.

Finally, the words he uses are so vivid, so descriptive, that anyone can understand completely what’s going on. He does not use weak words like some authors, but powerful ones that really show the whole story.

So, who is your favorite author?

For more information go to Gordon’s Official Website, check out this video, this video, this video (go to special events, click on 39 Clues Book Two Webcast, and go to “full webcast”), and this video.

Published in: on December 15, 2009 at 12:22 am  Leave a Comment  
Tags: , ,
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.